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Greta Review: Farcical psycho-thriller with unexpected laughs

We begin with an overtly romantic score, set back in the early 20th century, and are introduced to Chloë Grace Moretz's Frances McCullen serving as a waitress in an upper-clas...

Peggy Review: A polarising watch that has hits and misses

Justin O’Neal Miller’s Peggy is a truly polarising watch, its obvious strengths serving the unfortunate purpose of making its weaknesses all the more infuriating.

Sharkwater Extinction Review: Forget Jaws, humans are the real villains in Rob Stewart’s latest exposé on the illegal shark fin trade

Sharks. Are they violent, man-eating predators or majestic, underwater creatures in desperate need of protection? This polarising question is at the heart of the new documentary fr...

Jellyfish Review: James Gardner’s impressive debut finds a diamond in some serious rough

In an age where we have had no shortage of hard-knocks stories, James Gardner’s debut feature Jellyfish manages to take this trope and spin it in such a way as to create a characte...

RBG Review: Honouring the Supreme Court’s trailblazer of gender equality

There are few Americans who have had such a long-term effect on the state of their nation, relentlessly giving everything to improve the rights of the everyday person, making their...

Styx Review: A rhetorical feature with a story perhaps more suited to a documentary

Wolfgang Fischer’s new documentary-style feature film, focusing on the indifference of the Western World towards the refugee crisis, is emotive through rhetorical analysis on a mor...

Border Review: A dive into human morality and the struggle of belonging

Marrying the ideas of fitting in as an outcast and the intrigue of finding your tribe, Ali Abbasi’s Oscar nominated and award-winning film adds a fresh spin to the concepts of self...

Claire’s Camera Review: Putting the lens on Cannes

In the midst of awards season, with the Oscars just around the corner, there could not be a better time to watch Claire’s Camera, Hong Sang-Soos’s self-mocking retrospective on the...

Wale Review: A Familiar Conclusion To An Unexpected Set Up

Through its blurry disjointed opening, Wale grounds its viewers in a dizzying depiction of the nefarious nature of London’s urban nightlife.