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Edinburgh Review: All The King’s Men

All The King’s Men stand on stage in black and white, 90s boyband style tracksuits, with beautiful harmonies, excellent variety in their vocal range and a very strong beatbox under...

Edinburgh Review: Testosterone

Kit Redstone’s Testosterone throws the concept of masculinity back at us with a challenging retort – when do we identify as male? How do we define manhood? Is it a construct that w...

Edinburgh Review: The Man On The Moor

Max Dickins tells his story of an absent father, one that left the family home and never returned. Except Dickins has no idea whether he is dead or alive – one of the 200,000 peopl...

Edinburgh Review: Hidden

Sam Finch (Adam Donaldson) can’t control his anger at first – meditation, yoga, even breathing exercises don’t help. It transpires that this is the prequel to continuing episodes o...

Edinburgh Review: Education Education Education

Tobias (James Newton) opens Education Education Education with a deadpan, emotionless, stereotypically German delivery. An exchange teacher on his first day at a British comprehens...

Edinburgh Review: Two Sides Of The Curtain

Erich (Andrew Crouch) and Ada (Racheal Naylor) exist on separate sides of the most destructive structure in the 20th century – the wall splitting off communism from capitalism. To ...

Edinburgh Review: Gein’s Family Gift Shop Volume 3

Kath and Ed are carefree and rebellious – they may give us badges at the start of the show, but they don’t really give a fuck what we think. It’s a refreshing alternative versus pa...

Edinburgh Review: Wombmates

Eric (Aaron Dart) and David (Adam Mort) are twins sharing the womb. Wombmates, if you will – an example of the quality of punditry in store for this production. The show focusses a...

Edinburgh Review: Mother’s Ruin

Maeve Marsden and Libby Wood have pipes, spunk and the banter to back it up. Mother’s Ruin is a cabaret very much like its gin & tonic accompaniment – intoxicating, a bit tart ...

Edinburgh Review: Translunar Paradise

George Mann and Deborah Pugh prove that you don’t need facial expression to convey emotion in Translunar Paradise, a show that is as much about the masks worn as it is about the re...