A one-act, one-woman performance, Bunny submerges you into Katie’s mind (Catherine Lamb), as she tells of an evening in Luton bubbling over with a fight, a car chase, a stake-out and plenty of confusion. When Katie’s boyfriend gets into a trivial fight on her way back from school, she is dragged into a whirlwind of adventure and self-reflection.

Bunny Tristan Bates Theatre

Catherine Lamb (image courtesy of Michael Lindall)

Jack Thorne’s script is clever – fast-paced, efficient storytelling, as well as an authentic mapping of the mind of a nineteen year-old. Watching Katie (Lamb) recount her evening feels like catching up with a friend as she tells of her latest adventure, including all of the seemingly unrelated tangents about parents unable to truly understand their daughter.

Lucy Weller‘s set is completely bare but for one armchair, the only other presence on stage. It’s a brilliant move by Weller, a perfect representation of the loss of identity that comes with reaching your twenties. There are no signs of Katie decidedly being seen as either a teenager or an adult, but merely as a young woman who no longer belongs to a category at all.

Bunny Tristan Bates Theatre

Catherine Lamb (image courtesy of Michael Lindall)

Thorne’s Katie is lonely, awkward at times and in fruitless talks with her self-esteem. When she is told, pantiless, that she is “too easy” by a boy who she has only known for a couple of hours and whom she has no intention of having sex with, you can feel her dying inside. When she admits to the audience,

I don’t like thinking, I don’t like thinking, I don’t like thinking. But I do. Think. All the time.

You can feel yourself letting go of the breath you did not know you were holding. Lamb’s delivery is unkempt, gauche and fervent – a perfect insight into the brains of a young girl. Her Katie is outgoing, relatable and flawed and Curtis’ direction lets you see a young woman who is in full discovery of her sexual powers.

Bunny Tristan Bates Theatre

Catherine Lamb (image courtesy of Michael Lindall)

Bunny abounds in relevant social issues: multiculturalism, racial tensions between communities, council estates and youth culture. But the credibility of Katie, as someone we have all been or known, is what stays with you after the show ends. Katie starts her journey as merely a passenger, both metaphorically and literally, yet ends it with the biggest challenge any young person can face – taking control of your own life, and making a choice, all by yourself.

Bunny leaves you overwhelmed and exhausted. In fact, Bunny leaves you with the very experience of being a young woman in today’s world. As a woman in her mid-twenties who forgets on a daily basis that she is supposed to be an adult, thank you.

 

★★★★☆

To read more about Bunny, which plays at Tristan Bates Theatre until 27 January 2018, follow the company on Twitter (@FabricateTheatr) or visit the theatre’s website – www.tristanbatestheatre.co.uk

Click here for an interview with actor and producer Catherine Lamb.